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Trump Administration Releases Complete FY’18 Budget
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Trump Administration Releases Complete FY’18 Budget The Trump Administration released their much anticipated budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2018.  Budget requests include: cutting DOT spending by 13% to $16.2B; eliminating the TIGER grant program; ending funding for long-haul Amtrak routes … Read More

President-Elect Trump Taps Former Labor Secretary to Head US DOT
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Secretary-Designate Elaine Chao Will Execute Trump Infrastructure Plan President-elect Donald Trump has picked Elaine Chao, former U.S. Labor Secretary

The Rep. Fitzpatrick Amendment To The Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program Should Be Opposed
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Rep. Fitzpatrick has filed an amendment with the House Rules Committee that would define veteran-owned small businesses as “disadvantaged business enterprises” or “DBEs”.  While efforts to support the entrepreneurial efforts of former service members are very worthwhile, defining veteran owned … Read More

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FAA NEWS

FAA.gov News and Updates

Latest FAA.gov News and Updates

Today's Air Traffic Report:

Thunderstorms in the Midwest and South Florida may result in flight delays at Chicago (MDW, ORD), Denver (DEN), Ft. Lauderdale (FLL), Minneapolis-St. Paul (MSP) and Miami (MIA). Cloud cover will slow flights this morning in Boston (BOS) and San Francisco (SFO). Wind and holiday weekend volume could affect traffic flow in the New York area (EWR, JFK, LGA, TEB). Delays also are possible due to runway construction in Los Angeles (LAX).

Pilots: Check out the new Graphical Forecasts for Aviation (GFA) Tool from the Aviation Weather Center.

For up-to-the-minute air traffic operations information, visit fly.faa.gov, and follow @FAANews on Twitter for the latest news and Air Traffic Alerts.

The FAA Air Traffic Report provides a reasonable expectation of any daily impactsto normal air traffic operations, i.e. arrival/departure delays, ground stoppages, airport closures. This information is for air traffic operations planning purposes and is reliable as weather forecasts and other factors beyond our ability to control.

Always check with your air carrier for flight-specific delay information.

Posted: May 26, 2017, 1:42 pm

This week, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and its partners are conducting detection research on unmanned aircraft (UAS) popularly called drones at Dallas/Fort Worth International (DFW) Airport.

The DFW evaluation is the latest in a series of detection system evaluations that began in February 2016. Previous evaluations took place at Atlantic City International Airport; John F. Kennedy International Airport; Eglin Air Force Base; Helsinki, Finland Airport; and Denver International Airport.

Drones that enter the airspace around airports can pose serious safety threats. The FAA is coordinating with government and industry partners to evaluate technologies that could be used to detect drones in and around airports. This effort complies with congressional language directing the FAA to evaluate UAS detection systems at airports and other critical infrastructure sites.

At DFW, the Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi UAS test site is performing the flight operations using multiple drones. Gryphon Sensors is the participating industry partner. The companys drone detection technologies include radar, radio frequency and electro-optical systems.

The FAAs federal partners in the overall drone detection evaluation effort include the Department of Homeland Security; the Department of Defense; the Federal Bureau of Investigation; the Federal Communications Commission; Customs and Border Protection; the Department of the Interior; the Department of Energy; NASA; the Department of Justice; the Bureau of Prisons; the U.S. Secret Service; the U.S. Capitol Police; and the Department of Transportation. The work is part of the FAAs Pathfinder Program for UAS detection at airports.

The FAA intends to use the information gathered during this assessment and other previous evaluations to develop minimum performance standards for any UAS detection technology that may be deployed in or around U.S. airports. These standards are expected to facilitate a consistent and safe approach to UAS detection at U.S. airports.

Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #FAA

Posted: April 28, 2017, 9:53 pm

April 28- What might happen if a drone hits a person on the ground? Whats the risk of serious injury?

Although the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) cant yet definitively answer those questions, studies by a consortium of leading universities have made a start toward better understanding the risks of allowing small unmanned aircraft or drones to fly over people.

The consortium that conducted the research includes the University of Alabama-Huntsville; Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University; Mississippi State University; and the University of Kansas, through the Alliance for System Safety of UAS through Research Excellence (ASSURE). ASSURE represents 23 of the world's leading research institutions and 100 leading industry and government partners. It began the research in September 2015.

The research team reviewed techniques used to assess blunt force trauma, penetration injuries and lacerations the most significant threats to people on the ground. The team classified collision severity by identifying hazardous drone features, such as unprotected rotors.

The group also reviewed more than 300 publications from the automotive industry and consumer battery market, as well as toy standards and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) database. Finally, the team conducted crash tests, dynamic modeling, and analyses related to kinetic energy, energy transfer, and crash dynamics.

When the studies were complete, personnel from NASA, the Department of Defense, FAA chief scientists, and other subject matter experts conducted a strenuous peer review of the findings.

The studies identified three dominant injury types applicable to small drones:

  • Blunt force trauma the most significant contributor to fatalities
  • Lacerations blade guards required for flight over people
  • Penetration injuries difficult to apply consistently as a standard

The research showed multi-rotor drones fall more slowly than the same mass of metal due to higher drag on the drone. Unlike most drones, wood and metal debris do not deform and transfer most of their energy to whatever they hit. Also, the lithium batteries that power many small drones need a unique standard to ensure safety.

The team recommended continued research to refine the metrics developed. The team members suggested developing a simplified test method to characterize potential injury, and validating a proposed standard and models using potential injury severity test data.

The second phase of ASSUREs research is set to begin in June 2017, and will examine the risks of collisions with aircraft.

The report on the ASSURE research and two video files are available here:http://pr.cirlot.com/faa-and-assure-announce-results-of-ground-collision-study/

Amplify the news on Twitter and Facebook using #UASIMPACT

Posted: April 28, 2017, 9:51 pm

Mountain Flying: Experience and Training is Essential

Mountain flying is exhilarating, exciting, and challenging. It can open up new flying opportunities, but you need training, experience, and careful preparation to safely navigate those lofty peaks and spectacular scenery.

Your training should begin with a quality mountain flying course that includes adequate mountain ground and flight training. You have a narrow window of safety when flying around mountains so youll need the experience and knowledge gained from a recognized training program. After your training is complete, and before your first flight, make sure you perform a mountain checkout with a qualified mountain flight instructor.

Mountain flying, even more so than flight in the flatlands, is very unforgiving of poor training and poor planning. Its essential that you learn how to carefully prepare for the rigors and potential pitfalls of a mountain flight. Knowing the conditions is essential. The combination of weather and the surrounding terrain can cause dangerous wind, severe turbulence, and other conditions that may create serious challenges for a small GA aircraft. So, its important to use every available clue about the weather and terrain.

Even experienced mountain pilots may not be familiar with the way local conditions and terrain may affect an aircrafts performance. While enjoying the views at a high-density altitude, you can quickly become surprised by your aircrafts changing performance. The pressure altitude, corrected for temperature, will make your airplane perform as if it is at a higher altitude. This change can have an adverse impact on your aircrafts performance.

Here are the skills youll need:

  • Knowledge of your airplanes performance, including how your aircraft will perform in all weather conditions and at high altitudes. Youll need to review takeoff, climb, landing, cold starts, hot starts, and stalls, among other performance characteristics. Make sure you take conditions into consideration, and are leaning the engine correctly for optimum power. Your planes condition and performance is essential to your survival.
  • Flying skills. Do you have the skills needed to operate in extreme conditions, make decisions quickly and calmly, and fly in all types of weather?
  • Do you have a Plan B? This is critical when flying a GA aircraft in the mountains. You should have an alternative route to get you out of trouble, or the option of delaying your return to home base.
  • Survival. Are you experienced in personal survival techniques? Bitterly cold temperatures, high winds and other factors can land you in a position that you werent originally counting on. Be sure to pack specialized emergency and survival equipment on board. Youll want to include personal locator beacons, in addition to a 406 emergency local transmitter.

Mountain flying is demanding so you should carefully consider your experience and background before beginning a flight into mountainous terrain.

Checklist:

  • Are you fully knowledgeable about your capabilities and those of your aircraft?
  • Have you taken a specialized training course and worked with your flight instructor?
  • Are you aware that while youre focused on a type of flying that has great rewards, it also has heightened risk?

Those mountain views are beautiful, but theyre even more stunning when you can enjoy them safely.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the general aviation (GA) communitys national #FlySafe campaign is designed to educate GA pilots about the best practices to calculate and predict aircraft performance and to operate within established aircraft limitations.

Message from FAA Administrator Michael P. Huerta:
The FAA and industry are working together to prevent Loss of Control (LOC) accidents and save lives. You can help make a difference by joining our #Fly Safe campaign. Every month on FAA.gov, we provide pilots with Loss of Control solutions developed by a team of experts some of which are already reducing risk. I hope you will join us in this effort and spread the word. Follow #FlySafe on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. I know that we can reduce these accidents by working together as a community.

What is Loss of Control?
A LOC accident involves an unintended departure of an aircraft from controlled flight. LOC can happen when the aircraft enters a flight regime that is outside its normal flight envelope and quickly develops into a stall or spin. It can introduce an element of surprise for the pilot.

More about Loss of Control

Contributing factors may include:

  • Poor judgment or aeronautical decision making
  • Failure to recognize an aerodynamic stall or spin and execute corrective action
  • Intentional failure to comply with regulations
  • Failure to maintain airspeed
  • Failure to follow procedure
  • Pilot inexperience and proficiency
  • Use of prohibited or over-the-counter drugs, illegal drugs, or alcohol

Did you know?

  • In 2015, 384 people died in 238 general aviation accidents.
  • Loss of Control was the number one cause of these accidents.
  • Loss of Control happens in all phases of flight.It can happen anywhere and at any time.
  • There is one fatal accident involving Loss of Control every four days.

Learn more:

Read Tips on Mountain Flying, by the FAA FAASTeam.

This FAA Mountain Flying tip sheet has specific information designed to keep you safely in control of your aircraft.

Have you read the Extreme Weather edition of the FAA Safety Briefing? Rocky Mountain High: The Zen of Mountain Flying is just one of the good articles in this May/June 2012 issue.

Are you a practical type? If so, youll appreciate the Top Ten Practical Considerations for Mountain Flying on AvWeb.

This NTSB Safety Alert has lessons learned information that can be critical to your safety.

TheFAASafety.govwebsite has Notices, FAAST Blasts, online courses, webinars and more on key general aviation safety topics.

Check out GA Safety Enhancements fact sheets on the mainFAA Safety Briefingwebsite, including Flight Risk Assessment Tools.

TheWINGS Pilot Proficiency Programhelps pilots build an educational curriculum suitable for their unique flight requirements. It is based on the premise that pilots who maintain currency and proficiency in the basics of flight will enjoy a safer and more stress-free flying experience.

TheGeneral Aviation Joint Steering Committee (GAJSC)is comprised of government and industry experts who work together to use data to identify risk, pinpoint trends through root cause analysis, and develop safety strategies to reduce the risk of GA accidents. The GAJSC combines the expertise of many key decision makers in the FAA, several government agencies such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and stakeholder groups. Industry participants include the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association, Experimental Aircraft Association, General Aviation Manufacturers Association, Light Aircraft Manufacturers Association, National Business Aviation Association, National Air Transportation Association, National Association of Flight Instructors, Society of Aviation and Flight Educators, and the aviation insurance industry. The National Transportation Safety Board and the European Aviation Safety Agency participate as observers.

Amplify the new on Twitter and Facebook using #FlySafe

Posted: April 27, 2017, 11:29 pm

 

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